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When dieting gets dangerous

Let me introduce you to two hypothetical teens: Teen A and Teen B. Both teens go on diets. It could mean they want to lose a few pounds, it could be they are trying to “eat healthy” or be better at their sport. Regardless of why, they start cutting back on the amount and variety […]

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Picking apart picky eating, Part 2: Picky Eating in Adults

Unlike picky eating in children, the literature on picky eating in adults is much more sparse. As in, I found one paper on adult picky eating. Part of the problem is that adult picky eating has been an invisible disorder. Just as people assumed that eating disorders were strictly a “teen” thing, researchers thought that […]

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Picking Apart Picky Eating, Part 1: Selective Eating in Children

“Try it–you’ll like it!” It’s something children and toddlers hear a lot. Most kids go through phases of picky eating, sometimes even fairly extreme. Mostly, this is part of normal development. From an evolutionary standpoint, where not all foods were safe to eat (especially combined with a young child’s desire to put everything they can […]

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Eating Disorders and Laxative Abuse: What You Need to Know

After reading a news article about a young woman who died last year due to an eating disorder and laxative abuse, I thought that it was time I blogged on the subject. It’s not an easy subject to bring up, because it touches on several major subjects that are generally considered not polite for everyday […]

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EDs Behind Bars: Eating Disorders in Prisoners

Being imprisoned means being deprived of your personal freedoms. In an environment when almost every minutiae of your life is strictly controlled, and where a majority of inmates have some type of pre-existing psychiatric problem, all types of maladaptive behaviors can crop up. You yell, you fight. You’re belligerent. A large number of inmates engage […]

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The problem with “almost anorexia”

Hang on to your hats, people, because we have a new eating disorder in town. This one is called “almost anorexia.” Wait…what?!? Do we really need another pseudo-cutesy name for an eating disorder like pregorexia, drunkorexia, brideorexia, and manorexia that (in my opinion) negate the extreme suffering that accompany eating disorders? Also, in my opinion, […]

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Defining recovery: What contributes to recovery and remission from an ED?

In the first two blog posts of this series, I’ve looked at how researchers define recovery, and how patients do so. Now, I want to look at what factors predict recovery in eating disorders. But first, a note. When I talk about things that predict a negative outcome, it’s possible that you might recognize some […]

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Defining Recovery: What do researchers define as recovery?

Like I mentioned in my previous post, I’m going to be doing a series on my blog about definitions of recovery, what they are, and why they matter. For my first post, I’m going to start by discussing how researchers measure recovery. Considering that most of my readers are (judging by the email I receive […]

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When the “healthy eating” message goes very, very wrong

It seems you can’t go anywhere without seeing “healthy eating,” anti-obesity, weight loss messages. They’re literally everywhere. Besides the magazines in the grocery store checkout lines, Pinterest boards, and mass media, children are receiving lots of these messages in school. More and more schools, it seems, are limiting sweets that can be brought in for […]

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A binge by any other name: Objective vs. Subjective binge eating

It’s a question I’ve been asked many times: what, exactly, is a binge anyway? Is it eating too much? Eating a lot of food? What? The DSM isn’t necessarily much more helpful. Take the new criteria for Binge Eating Disorder (via Mayo Clinic, as the APA pulled down the draft criteria from their website) that […]

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